East Asian Desserts You May Never Heard Of Before

Asian, Desserts -

East Asian Desserts You May Never Heard Of Before

After covering some decadent desserts of South-East Asia we have another list of mouth-watering desserts from East Asia for you.

Check out South-East Asian Desserts You May Never Heard Of Before

Hong Kong

1. Little Bao

 

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Now you must know the traditional Chinese Bao buns and enjoyed them from time to time. But these Bao ice-creams at Little Bao will surpass all your expectations. Nice circular ice-cream in between two sweet and little crispy baos is a delight. An exciting new way of eating Bao is a must try.

 

2. Hup Tul Woo

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Hup Yul Woo, Walnut Soup is a favorite among locals. It is usually enjoyed as a snack. In spite of being dairy-free, this soup is rich and creamy. Hup Yul Woo is comforting and a must try dessert.

 

 

Taiwan

1. Wheel Cake

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Wheel cake or red bean cake ‘azuki’ or ‘taiko manjū ‘is a classic Taiwanese dessert, supposedly originated in Japan. The outer cover is shaped using a machine and filled with sweet red bean paste. Wheel cakes are now found with a number of different stuffing; both sweet and savory, all over the Asian region. They are delicious and a beloved dessert.

 

2. Taro ball

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Taro Ball or Jiu Fen Taro Ball as the name suggests is made from taro roots. Made popular in the mountainous town of Jiu Fen in Taiwan or more preciously Ruifang, a small town at the foothills of Jui Fen; taro ball is a traditional Taiwanese dessert. The sweet, chewy balls are eaten in many different ways, with sweet potato balls, purple or yellow or orange yam, rice pudding or candied red beans. During summers it is served with shaved ice or grass jelly, sweet syrup and with ginger brown sugar syrup during winter and rainy seasons.

 

3. Taro Swirl Mooncake

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Taro swirl mooncakes are Taiwanese version of traditional mooncakes which are prepared during the moon festival in Asia. Where the mooncakes are rich and made of lotus seed or red bean paste, these taro mooncakes are flaky and light with sweet taro paste.

 

China

1. Longevity peach bun

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 It’s an age-old tradition of making longevity buns as a symbol of immortality. They are specially prepared for the birthday celebrations of the elderly. The soft peach shaped white dough with sweet lotus seed filling represent Peaches of Immortality which ripen after thousands of years and grant immortality when consumed (according to Wikipedia).

 

2. Steamed Egg Sponge Cake

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Steamed egg sponge cake is influenced by western desserts but made using just flour, eggs and sugar. This steamed cake is soft, moist and spongy. It is made in different shapes, but a top cracked cake or smiling cake is considered to be a bringer of good luck.

 

3. Jelly Mooncake

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Mooncakes are traditional Chinese dessert prepared during Chinese Lunar Festival. Jelly Mooncake is the modernized version of traditional mooncake, which is made with lotus seed filling and eggs. Today, there are many different variations of this dessert are available not only in Asia but outside as well. The jelly filling is made using agar jelly and it is also done in a lot of flavors, from pandan, dragon fruit to espresso or Nutella flavors.

 

 

Japan

1. Shingen Momo

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Shingen momo is a specialty of Yamanashi. White bean paste and the famous peaches of Yamanashi are wrapped in white dough and colored in attractive pink color. This historic sweet is enjoyed with a hot cup of green tea like other Wagashi (Japanese sweets) sweets. The soft, chewy dough and sweet peach flavor on the inside are enjoyed by locals as well as tourists.

 

2. Melon Pan

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Melon pan or melon bread is just simple sweet classic Japanese bread. ‘Pan’ means bread in Japanese and it is called melon not because it tastes like melon but due to the grid-like appearance of the bread which resembles melon. Today variations of melon bread can be found with matcha, chocolate chips, melon puree or custard filling.  

 

3. Yomogi Dango

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 Yomogi is Japanese mugwort and dango is sweet rice flour dumpling. Yomogi is an aromatic herb and is used in many Japanese recipes for its natural green color and refreshing aroma. Yomogi dango is made with tofu, red beans or azuki filling. The spring-like taste and alluring green color of this dango are enjoyed a lot.

 

 

South Korea

1. Gaepi-tteok / Baram-tteok

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Gaepi tteok, popular name for Baran tteok is a traditional Korean dessert made during birthdays and special occasions. The half-moon shaped non-glutinous rice cake or ‘tteok’ is filled with air or ‘baram’ and stuffed with azuki bean paste. Azuki bean paste stuffing is changed with sesame, dry fruits, sugar, sweet red bean paste, etc.

 

2. Honey Bread (Brick Toast)

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Korean Honey Bread or Brick Bread is a popular dessert in Korea. Originated in Japan this dessert is easily found in Korean cafes and bakeries. It is served with whipped cream, ice-cream, chocolate chips/syrup, fruits, etc. various sweet topping. A fun and delicious dessert which is loved mostly by the younger generation.

 

3. Hodugwaja

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Hodugwaja is commonly known as Korean Walnut Pastry/Cookies or Korean Walnut Cake. Hodugwaja looks like walnut and is made with sweet red bean paste or sometimes mung bean filling and crushed walnuts in a cookie-like dough. Its taste is similar to the ‘taiyaki’, fish-shaped pastry but nuttier. These bite-sized snack desserts are a favorite among locals and easily found at street side stalls.

 

Mongolia

1. Khailmag

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Khailmag or caramelized clotted cream, ‘Urum’ is traditionally made from yak’s milk, sugar and flour. This deliciously rich dessert is a local favorite. It tastes like creme brulee but with a rough texture.

 

2. Mongolian Poppy Seeds Buns

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Inspired from the poppy seed buns around the globe, these Mongolian Poppy Seed Buns are simple and tasty. They are preferably made from cow’s milk and poppy seeds are sprinkled on the top.

 

3. Boortsog

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Boortsog is a classic Mongolian Butter cookie. They are preferred tea time snack. The buttery doughy sweet is sometimes served with honey, butter or cheese. They can be found hot at the street side vendors or in packages in stores.

Let us know what which of these delicious east Asian desserts have you tried before or dying to try in the comments below.


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